Wednesday, 24 August 2016

The GSA’s Digital Design Studio and the University of Hull bring aviatrix Amy Johnson to life.


A 3D digital simulation of celebrated aviatrix Amy Johnson has been created 
by the GSA's DDS and HIVE at the University of Hull. 
The team is now working on a 3D digital simulation of William Wilberforce.

Experts in 3D simulation and visualisation at the GSA’s Digital Design Studio and computer scientists at the University of Hull are bringing one of the Hull’s most famous heroines back to ‘life’ it was revealed today, 24 August 2016.

A fully interactive digital 3D version Amy Johnson – the first woman to fly a plane solo from England to Australia – was unveiled in Hull this morning as part of an international programme of arts and engineering sciences events commemorating the 75th anniversary of her death.  

Aviator Amy Johnson with her Gypsy Moth plane

The technologies used to create her are similar to those used by Hollywood studios to create creatures and characters for films such as Gollum in Lord of the Rings.  Motion capture using a combination of full body and detailed facial movements was undertaken at the DDS with an actor, Rachel Harris, reading pre-prepared scripts. The costume Amy is wearing meanwhile was captured using photogrammetry techniques and the soundtrack made in DDS’s special sound studio.

The outcome of the collaboration is life-sized interactive projections and screenings of Amy Johnson which will be seen at various points across the city of Hull.

The DDS is now working on the second part of the collaborative project to create a virtual William Wilberforce – the Hull-born MP who pioneered the abolition of slavery movement in the 19th century.

Dr Paul Chapman, Acting Director of the Digital Design Studio at the GSA said: “We’re very happy to have worked with the University of Hull on this project creating the high quality motion capture and 3D modelling of Amy Johnson and William Wilberforce. We feel positive that the exhibition will be a success and will highlight the incredible lives of these two pioneers”.

Dr Jon Purdy, HIVE Centre Manager at the University of Hull, said: “It’s an honour to get the opportunity to recreate two pioneering historical figures using movie-standard special effects. The technology we’ve adopted means the Amy and William characters will be recreated in a very realistic way and in high definition. The characters will recount stories from their life – retelling significant points in history in an unusual and interactive way.”

Professor John Oldfield, Director of the Wilberforce Institute for the Study of Slavery and Emancipation at the University of Hull, said: “Recreating Wilberforce has been an extremely rewarding collaborative project. It has also been an exciting opportunity for one of our Drama students, who has helped us to bring Wilberforce to life by performing as William during the motion capture element of the process. Working with HIVE and the Digital Design Studio at Glasgow School of Art has opened up new and innovative ways of interpreting historical characters and getting across important messages about slavery and Hull's legacy of freedom.”

The virtual Amy Johnson and William Wilberforce build on the work that the DDS undertook for the award-winning Battle of Bannockburn Visitor centre through its partnership with Historic Environment Scotland in the CDDV.

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For further information on DDS contact
Lesley Booth,
0779 941 4474
@GSofAMedia

For further information on the University of Hull contact:
Nic Oldfield 
01482 466361

Notes for Editors


For more information about the University of Hull, see www.hull.ac.uk

Connect via Twitter: @UniOfHull, Facebook: facebook.com/universityofhull, or download the app at https://hull.ombiel.co.uk/get

Digital Design Studio at The Glasgow School of Art (DDS)
The DDS currently specialises in postgraduate teaching and research. It has been a leader in research and development within the field of high-end 3D simulation and visualisation since 1997.Working with EU and UK Research Councils, Government departments and blue-chip companies, the DDS has created advanced visualisation products in various industries including the automotive, built environment, defence, shipbuilding and medical sectors. The DDS has a strong background in the medical visualisation sector, and has produced 3D digital models of selected anatomy to support activities such as pre-operative planning, risk reduction, surgical simulation and increased patient safety.

The DDS is a partner in the CCDV (with Historic Environment Scotland and CyArk) which has delivered the admired Scottish 10  - 3D visualisations of five of Scotland’s UNESO World Heritage sites and five international heritage sites to foster global collaboration and build lasting partnerships based on cultural connections.  It is currently creating 3D models of Scotland’s most recent UNESO World Heritage site, the Forth Bridge. The DDS also created the award-winning 3D visualisations and soundscapes for the state of the art digital battle scenes as part of the transformation of visitor facility to mark the 700th anniversary of the Battle of Bannockburn in 2014.


Tuesday, 23 August 2016

New Academic appointments at the GSA

         
Professor Ken Neil and Professor Irene McAra-McWilliam, the GSA's two new Deputy Directors


The Glasgow School of Art has appointed two new Deputy Directors it was announced today, 23 August 2016.

Professor Ken Neil, currently Head of Research at the GSA, has been appointed Deputy Director (Academic) - a role which oversees the GSA’s three schools (Mackintosh School of Architecture, School of Design and School of Fine Art) together with Research and Learning & Teaching.

Professor Irene McAra-McWilliam, currently Head of the School of Design, is appointed Deputy Director (Innovation) overseeing projects including the development of GSA’s Highlands and Islands campus at Altyre and driving forward the design innovation agenda at the GSA.

Meanwhile, Dr Alastair Payne, Head of the School of Fine Art has been awarded a Professorship by the University of Glasgow and Dr Laura Gonzales is appointed a Reader.

The GSA also confirmed the appointment of Alastair Milloy as the new Director of Finance and Resources succeeding Eliot Leviten who retires at the beginning of December, and Scott Parsons as Director of Strategy & Marketing.

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Further information:
Lesley Booth
0779 941 4474
@GSofAMedia

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Thursday, 18 August 2016

Learning Legacy of Historic Glasgow Building Preserved as GSA officially takes over Stow College building and site

The former Stow College building and site which was officially handed over the the GSA today
    The Glasgow School of Art officially took over the former Stow College building and site from Glasgow Kelvin College today. Marking the occasion Prof Tom Inns said:

    "Acquiring the Stow College building and site means the GSA can fulfil its plan to return the Mackintosh Building to its original academic configuration as a home for all first year students and bring together all pathways in the School of Fine Art in one specially-adapted building for first time in over 50 years. 

    It will also help us achieve our academic aspiration to become a global leader in studio-based learning and research and means we can create the space to support collaboration across our disciplines as well as with other academic, third-sector and industry partners.”

    The purchase of the former Stow College building site at a cost of £6m was concluded earlier this month. Conversion work is about to begin with the School of Fine Art moving into the building from autumn 2017.

    Full Glasgow Kelvin College press release below

    Further information on the development of the building:
    Lesley Booth
    GSA Press and Media
    0779 941 4474
    press@gsa.ac.uk
    @GSofAMedia

    News Release

    • College delighted that legacy of learning is being preserve
    • Refurbishment of historic building is key part of the GSA’s Garnethill campus development 
    • Kelvin College to share Archive for Stow Building with the GSA

    Glasgow Kelvin College is to share the archive for the iconic Stow building, a familiar Glasgow landmark, with The Glasgow School of Art which has purchased the building and site as part of its Garnethill campus development programme it was confirmed today, 18 August 2016.
    At a small ceremony held this week to mark the transition, Principal Alan Sherry of Glasgow Kelvin College showed material from the archive to Professor Tom Inns, Director of The Glasgow School of Art. 
    The archive contains a wide range of materials including photographs, city plans, floorplans, former students’ certificates and qualifications collected over the last 80 years, plus a wealth of written materials and testimonials which have been digitised for ease of access.  The archive dates back to Stow’s days as a teacher-training college and also contains mementoes of its great industrial and engineering heritage.
    Alan Sherry said;
    “We are delighted that the building will remain within the education sector in Glasgow. 
    “This iconic Glasgow Building has a special place in the hearts of many and we are reassured that GSA will have the resources, skills and imagination to create and invest in a whole new and exciting learning space for the future where Stow’s legacy will be preserved.”
    Marking the handover of the former Stow College building and site to the GSA, Director Tom Inns said:
    “We are delighted to be able to bring the former Stow College building into The Glasgow School of Art’s Garnethill campus ensuring it continues to be a major centre of learning.

    Acquiring the Stow College building and site means the GSA can fulfil its plan to return the Mackintosh Building to its original academic configuration as a home for all first year students and bring together all pathways in the School of Fine Art in one specially-adapted building for first time in over 50 years.

    It will also help us achieve our academic aspiration to become a global leader in studio-based learning and research and means we can create the space to support collaboration across our disciplines as well as with other academic, third-sector and industry partners .”

    Following the regionalisation of Scotland’s college sector, the Glasgow Regional Curriculum and Estates Review identified the opportunity for a relocation of resources and, as the least optimum campus, the ageing Stow building, Glasgow Kelvin College’s fifth campus, was placed on the market.
    In April 2016 the GSA launched its Mackintosh Campus Appeal, a £32m fundraising campaign (£17m already secured) which will enable the institution to recover from the impact of the fire and meet its academic ambitions. This will be achieved through a sensitive and authentic restoration of the west wing and upgrading of the east wing of the of the Mackintosh Building and the purchase of the Stow College site at and the development of studio and workshop space in the Stow Building.
    The purchase of the former Stow College site at a cost of £6m was concluded earlier this month. Conversion work is about to begin with the School of Fine Art moving into the building from autumn 2017.

    The sale was handled by Cushman Wakefield, with legal representation for Glasgow Kelvin College by Thornton’s Solicitors. The GSA’s legal advisers were CMS Solicitors, and the GSA was also advised by JLL.

    ENDS

    For Further information, please contact:

    Lesley Lang, Communications & Planning Manager
    Tel:  0141-630 5168
    Mob:  07860 730 909


    Notes for Editors

    Stow College

    Opened by the then Glasgow Corporation on 26 September 1934 Stow College takes its name from David Stow (1793-1864), a Victorian philanthropist and one of the greatest pioneers in the history of Scottish education.

    In the early years, Stow was known as the Trades School, and provided evening courses for workers from the heavy engineering and shipbuilding companies located on the banks of the Clyde. Following a brief interlude in World War Two when the College operated as a Rolls Royce production centre manufacturing aero engines for the war effort, the College was left  with specialist labs that enabled the development of more advanced courses.

    The College quickly established a reputation for providing high quality training and with the expansion of Further Education in the late 1950s and 1960s, Stow College became the centre of FE in Glasgow, acting as the cradle for the development of other Colleges in the city.

    In November 2013, the College merged with John Wheatley College and North Glasgow College to form the new Glasgow Kelvin College.

    For almost 80 years, then, Stow College played a key role in learning in Glasgow and this continues through Glasgow Kelvin College, whose strong links with its surrounding communities continue to grow and flourish.


    The Glasgow School of Art

    The Glasgow School of Art (GSA) was founded in 1845 as one of the first Government Schools of Design, as a centre of creativity promoting good design for the manufacturing industries of Glasgow.  However, the School’s lineage can be traced to 1753 when Robert Foulis established a school of art and design in Glasgow, which was described as the single most influential factor in the development of eighteenth-century Scottish Art

    Today, The GSA is internationally recognised as one of Europe's leading university-level institutions for the visual creative disciplines. Our studio-based approach to research and teaching brings disciplines together to explore problems in new ways to find new innovative solutions. The studio creates the environment for inter-disciplinary working, peer learning, critical inquiry, experimentation and prototyping, helping to addressing many of the great challenges confronting society and contemporary business.